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Dungeon Canyon Took Our Breaths Away

Dungeon Canyon anchor

We found Dungeon Canyon to be quite impressive. It’s another wide open area with lots of sites to beach anchor, plenty of space between boats for added privacy. As the day progressed, we enjoyed watching the way the light changed on the different rock faces surrounding us as the sun set and the warm, gold glow in the canyon turned more to a pinkish yellow before it cooled off and finally set just before the canyon turned dark.

Dungeon Canyon anchor

The view at dusk off the stern of Kismet. (Above)

Jim climbing back onto boat   Jim climbing back onto boat

Jim is giving a demonstration on how we embark and disembark the boat when beach anchored in Lake Powell.

Jim climbing back onto boat   Jim climbing back onto boat

Dungeon Canyon anchor

The view at dusk off the starboard side of Kismet. (Above)

Dungeon Canyon anchor

You can barely see Kismet here (above and to the left), just a tiny speck in this vast canyon.

Ranger Tug, Kismet at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell

Lots of opportunities for beach anchoring in this canyon.

Ranger Tug, Kismet at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell

Ranger Tug, Kismet at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell

Ranger Tug, Kismet, at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell   Anchor Line, Dungeon Canyon. Lake Powell

Ranger Tug, Kismet at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell

Ranger Tug, Kismet, at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell   

Jim is checking to see if he could get an internet signal (above), using our liverpool cards as an iPad stand (ingenious). We found that we had to be within sight of Navajo Mountain to get any kind of signal, that made staying in touch a little challenging but we actually welcomed the time to be “unavailable.”

Dungeon Canyon anchor

Dungeon Canyon anchor

Stone sculpture, Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell   Fire ring, Lake Powell

Ranger Tug, Kismet, at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell   Dungeon Canyon hike

Indian steps   Ranger Tug, Kismet, at anchor in Dungeon Canyon, Lake Powell

We walked all around our anchorage in search of these Moki (Moqui) Steps (above – left), carved out of the rock by ancient Pueblo (Anasazi) Peoples between 700 and 1,700 years ago. After almost two hours of searching we had given up and turned to go back to the boat but then, in an area we hadn’t even considered to look, they just kind of popped out at us when we made our way around this big rock.

Dungeon Canyon anchor

This is how the light changes at dusk. First just a less intense gold/orange (above) to finally a cooler pinkish green (below).

Dungeon Canyon anchor

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